Refs Strike Again, Negating Sessions’ Near Field-Length Return

Rookie linebacker Clint Sessions scooped up the first of his two interceptions Sunday as it bounced off two teammates in the Colts’ end zone, and in one motion rolled to a standing position and took off, never having been touched. He motored all the way to the Chargers’ 7-yard-line.

But wait! That bane of NFL fair play strikes again … the inadvertant whistle. On the replay you hear it blow while Sessions is running, just before he exits the end zone. Why on earth would it blow then? The call on the field was an interception. This could have drastically altered the game, which San Diego won by 2 points. As it was, the Colts, starting on their own 20, didn’t score at all on the possession.

I know, I know. The Colts beat themselves, with Peyton Manning being very un-Peyton-like, throwing 6 interceptions, a club record, and Adam Vinitieri, that paragon of all football kickers, missing two field goals, including a chip shot that should have won the game in the closing minutes. Still, with all they did wrong, had the official not blown this call the Colts could have—probably would have—won.

I’m not a Colts fan. I am just a fan who is tired of referees deciding games and robbing NFL fans of exciting plays due to their bungling incompetence.

Manning’s performance (or lack thereof) is a huge story, as is Vinitieri’s meltdown. Tony Dungy, with typical class, cited a myriad of reasons the Colts didn’t win the game, portraying it as their own fault. And that it was … for all but one play … the Sessions end-zone interception.

The Chargers jumped out to a huge lead early, riding the coattails of great defense and special teams (two kick return TDs) play. Philip Rivers and LaDainian Tomlinson did not play well.

But neither did the Colts. Still, even though Indy was minus Marvin Harrison and other key players, they almost pulled it off. And they would have, if that errant ref had been competent.

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